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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 947 (some duplicates have been removed)
? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is education and w
education program on the occasion of the 2012 international human rights day. offered by commissioners murase and mendoza. >> is there a motion? >> so moved. >> second. >> reading of the resolution by commissioner murase or mendoza. >> whereas san francisco became the birth place of the united nations with the signing of the u.n. charter at the war memorial veterans building in 1945 and annually december 10th marks international human rights day to celebrate the universal declaration of human rights, the first achievement. united nations. and whereas the san francisco-based foundation founded by the legendary rock band the grateful dead has advanced education about the universal declaration of human rights among youth and adults called the world it's could be." and whereas by delivering human rights curriculum to the creative arts the groundbreaking curriculum is designed to engage youth, inspire learning and critical thinking and positive social interaction, encourage youth who are often marginalized due to learning or physical differences to enjoy participation in school-wide ev
always do, especially after being solely instructed by hydra as our education advisor to present the proclamation declaring the month of oct filipino-american month in san francisco. come on up here. get up here, so everybody can take a picture here. if i may, i just wanted to say something as well. you know, there are many streets of our great, great city and everybody i think is now enjoying so many of the neighborhoods that are rising up. but there have been neighborhoods like desoma and the excelsior, critical names of streets that we named after filipinos who really served our city and country in a fabulous way. i want to make sure that people remember that. because it's part of our history. so let me say some of them that many of you in the room know, but a lot of our people don't know that. you ever see the names? (listing names ) if you were really smart and if you are as smart as hydra wants everybody to be in san francisco, because of her board of education work, you should know victoria manalo dreys park. that was named after vicky dreyes, a filipino olympian from san
talk about addressing issues like suicide and the extent to which we need to educate the family, um, it's critical that we also broaden that focus with regard to educating all of america with regard to the issues facing this community. so, that there really can be that broad-based community support. i think there is this issue relative to the discussion of suicide, that i had mentioned, that is important. and i think it is the difficulty, the discrimination, and the myths about the way you have to engage to talk about suicide is one thing we have to overcome. and that's particularly true in the military because of the warrior culture. and the military itself is shifting their own philosophy and values and saying it's acceptable to talk now about the fact that you might be considering suicide. you have to understand that that may be going on in the military. and the great thing about the fact that, that military members become depressed, also think about suicide, which is a normative experience in many ways, that what is available is 1-800-273-talk, which is the national suicide preventi
to take a stand, i hope and a pray that everyone here in this room, on this board, all educators, parents, security, secretaries, whoever they may be, who are in charge of our children when they are not in our care, and they are at the school site that we have the utmost compassion and respect for our children. so i just wanted to say thank you because all of you know on this board know how many times that have i come forward and asked for help, but what i have gotten in return is removal. i would like for you to reach out to me, because i know what works in the bayview and in the southeast. i know the families and the communities in the bayview. i know the church leaders in the bayview and in the southeast sector of the city. i know that we need to close the achievement gap of the targeted population, which is the african-american, the latinos, the polynesians, and our chinese-american children, because we are having all of these problems at our school sites our chinese-american children have come to me and told me that they will not do well in the c s.a.t. and they are struggling and t
program as stated is a fully funded program for youth and educators. at it's highly competitive. so the students going on this program are truly amazing and we're lucky to be traveling with three students from san francisco unified and one educator from there. and just to highlight a few of these things that students will be doing, really stepping out of their comfort level to live as commissioner mendoza said with their host families in bangladesh and will meet nobel laureate mohammed hamas. among many other interesting things. i will let them speak a little bit about their excitement about this program. >> hi, i just would really like to thank world savvy for this wonderful opportunity. i know i will learn so much not just from my host family, but from kids in a different country, which is just so amazing. not only a different country, but across the country and across the bay. so thank you. >> good evening, folks. thanks for having us here. we're just honored to carry on the great work that san francisco is doing into another part of the world. san francisco has been a leader
else, the other part of that strategy and that goal is to do a much more serious education marketing campaign. we've got to educate everybody using our streets. so, we're choosing today in the middle of the beginning of our holiday season with everybody's attention on having great fun, having wonderful events, having serious sales that allow people to shop, this is where the consciousness has to be risen. and, so, in light of this, we picked this day and this time and this area of year to make this announcement that we have a pedestrian strategy that's going on, a serious one. we're jointly doing it with the collaboration of all the different departments. we have asked and part of the strategy will be our police department, really doing a lot more enforcement strategically in all the areas that we need to, with not only stops, not only enforcement and ticketing, but a serious effort to remind people that these are going to be spots where we are going to pay a lot more attention. we have the mta, with ed's leadership and his staff, parking and traffic and others, working to do some of
, and angela. and the parliament tear undersecretary of state at the department of education, the children's minister edward. edward, andrew, angela, it's a delight to have you. before we hear from andrew and angela, i call in order to read a message from the prime minister, from yorkshire. [applause] member of the parliament, i'm -- [inaudible] we are -- this is your opportunity to debate -- by more than [inaudible] 260,000 people. -- [inaudible] include -- [inaudible] the children and the people. he has -- [inaudible] to listen to your -- [inaudible] and translate your views to the hard work of government. your meeting today will be young people ato -- the opportunity to debate issues that -- [inaudible] it's a big thing. i wish you the latest -- [inaudible] i look forward to hearing your debates. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for reading that. that is a delight to have the prime minister's support. i now call to say some words to us, the leader of the house of commons. mr. andrew. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. [applause] thank you, mr. speaker. members of the you'll parking
that are kind of active in your life. so, i hope that this kind of education that will help people who are victims of violence, actually recognize that they are being exploited that they are in violent situations and it will give them the courage to kind of move out of those situation buzz but what i have found is people who are from the working class and are strained and unemployed, don't have the means to leave abusive situations. president chu made sure that more money goes into this and it is long overdue and so if the experience of me, the experience of the level of discourse around the issue of domestic violence has increased this past year, and then, that is a good thing. you know? and i am glad that more money and more attention is being given to this. i hope that in the future we see more women of color associated with this issue, today i don't see any. there are not any here, aliana lopez had a different perspective she was never brought into the conversation as somebody who was part of the conversation should never have bought into the conversation. and so hopefully, that o
who raised three kids on her own didn't have a college education, but she just, you know, imbued in me the notion that i could do anything i wanted to do. >> how did she do that? did she just tell you that every day? or how did you feel she knew that? >> well, she had very high expectations and let me know that she expected me to do well in school. but when i would talk to her about, gee, i'd love to work in the white house someday, or i'm interested in politics, i'm interested in being a lawyer, she never said -- she said you'll have to study hard, you'll have to make good grades, because you'll need to get a scholarship, because i won't be able to afford it. but she never said, you know, it was the sky's the limit. that really was her view. and it really made me think i could do anything. so i did go to law school, and in the early '80s when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice and was going around to law firms, and even at that point there weren't that many women in the law firms. and i had guys who were interviewing me sit me down and say, now, do you under
. we're nonprofit and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the commu
assumed. guest: we are in non-partisan grass-roots organization devoted to educating the public about fiscal issues. guest: if we go over the cliff, it is not the end of the discussion. it is important people and not lose hope -- that people not lose hope for justice in what happens by midnight is the end of the discussion. the discussions will go on. i am relatively sure if we do not have a deal by december 31, there will be one in january. the damage to the economy would be too great. the public outcry will be significant i will be looking at the dow and s&p. those will get daily responses. host: we can talk more about the deals down the road. let's go to louann on the republican line. caller: to me, the fiscal cliff is a small smokescreen. the fiscal cliff that is coming is obamacare. nobody is addressing obamacare. i have to find out friday will be taxed 2.3% on any device used on us in any of the medical fields. my husband's doctor wrote out a prescription for a blood drop for january. he said i do not know how much this will cost you out of pocket because of obamacare. my husban
. but i'd like to think that that is not the system or the education system or any government system that got me there. i like to think that as much in your case, it was family and have a determination to be focused. but what do you think should be done in our education system, in our government system to try to free up that knowledge and make it look attractive for our people, for minorities to want to have that desire to want to learn the way out into want to learn how to be just as successful as those that they look up to? >> even writing the book and reading and watching all the things that i watch, one of the things that has stuck with me since writing the book is that john lackey and brown men, young boys, they're not educated. they're not accepted in the educational system. part is cultural, party societal. but the dinosaur had the ice age and we have the education and technology age. in the dinosaur didn't make the adjustment is not hearing more. the black and brown male won't be here. the job we used to do, we can't do anymore. not the manufacturing base a lot. we have to ma
the notification and education program survey and early notification portions are the sort of the new pieces that aren't required by state law. we are using those outreach efforts, those outreach components to inform who we talk to in the actual statutory opt out phase. we are not suggesting that anyone who is going to be served by cleanpower sf would not receive an opt out notification. anyone who wishes to participate can participate which sounds like opting in, but we won't enroll them after we have included them in an opt out process. so i think we have worked with the city attorney on this to make sure we are accurately understanding our obligation and that our approach is consistent with it. we think it is. and so we're not always this careful with our language as we should be, but the actual steps will be anyone who says "let me in" will receive and be included in the opt out portion of the program. >> thank you. >> you're welcome. >> can i add also the people who are seen in the green area that are saying "i don't want to be in the program". they too will be included in the pr
secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say something. i get to say something. as everyone in
the country. because the data shared by our u.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site
have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginaliz
on the san francisco public utilities commission and for the education plans for the choice aggregation and cleanpower sf program. >> okay. very good. colleagues it's a really as president torres as said it's a momentous occasion, historic occasion we had. we improved our relationship with shell and the allocation for the cleanpower sf and we're looking how the power can be maximized in the next year as we in fact the process of enrollment. i've actually believe that the timing of this could not be anymore -- anymore important to do today because of our global climate change that is happening, and i believe that we're seeing -- actually on the way here today i was listening to the radio. there was a report on democracy now that a portion of our artic ice about the size of the united states of america had melted this year which is significant to really alter what the temperature of the ocean is and we're seeing what really the impact of -- every year we're seeing dramatic examples of climate change and hurricane sandy being one of them. we're also seeing around the world real demogr
long enough to explain the differences as well and to educate on those nuances of renewable energy credit versus bundleeled kilowatt hours and it's complex and i don't know how long they will colerate -- tolerate us on the porch talking but that is a key part and the education component in order to survey them and what they think is an important part of it, so we will be conducting our third city wide customer survey in early january to test this new premium price that we have established and as well as this and the pg&e green tariff option is available to them. we will use the results of the surveys then to redine the roll out of the program. it will help us make sure we anticipate the right number of -- right percentage of opt out across the city, and we will take that heat map i showed you with the green and that survey will modify the specifics of that heat map again because we will have better information once again about customer acceptance of the program and then that wraps up the first quarter and we will have enough information then to come to the public utilities commis
to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self regulation and other skills and specific focus and exciting working with them the past year and a half or so so i want people to have a look here, and what i would like to do is tie some of the things together that you have been hearing about today and in terms of bullying prevention, other prevention work going on in your state and in terms of promoting positive behaviors with youth, and so sometimes
can urriculum that's based on the importance of reading, literacy, education, we have a whole violence prevention can urriculum, we have 22,000 kids playing baseball throughout northern california, junior giants baseball, and we have a number of volunteer coaches and commissioners and one of the things that we ask every year our junior giants players to do is to take the peace pledge. it's basically the pledge is i'm a junior giant, i pledge to strike out violence by, and the first line is prevent bullying and respecting my teammates, coaches, family and friends. so at the peer grass roots level where we have coaches working closely with kids we hope to spread a message, we also have an art contest, imagine peace where we honor kids at a ballgame later in the year just so kids can interpret and show their form of how they interpret anti-bullying and peace in this society. you know, it's not perfect, it doesn't always work. i think sometimes people tune us out. but we feel strongly that with the partnerships that we have in the community we can make an impact and i think there's a bias
services to the arab couldn't health and education and immigration his days start in the early mornings, commuting between court appointments homes of low increase and disabled clints, hospitals and schools and his work leads into the late evenings he can be found in the late trip ac's where he tutors nearly 50 america youth to help them understand the important of education their futures in the world and academic excellence his mint doesn't stop at mentoring he helps many student pursue scholarships to per view their dreams for higher education he understand the value and importance of community service and empowering our people to be strong and proud and conscious and capable members of the community who never forgot their heritage. so abraham, on behalf of the city and county of the san francisco x we will like to presented you with the 2012 distinguished service award. (applause). >>> thank you all and i appreciate this very much from the government of san francisco and i thanks our community at large and everyone who is here and for them, i thank them also and we will try our be
of education and skills training and research and innovation. we will not have the resources to be able to provide those kinds of services to the american public let alone to our children's future. >> when all the things that he mentioned that america needs to do not just in the short term, with these two new hurdles, but in the longer term, immigration, energy, all of the big things. washington cannot get anything done if we have had this kind of an absurd fight over this 1 deal. >> 1 of the things you will notice is that the house passed a bill on a bipartisan basis and sent them to the senate. the senate did not take those bills up. the tax bill which came back to us yesterday was a great example of that. we passed that bill with bipartisan support on august 1st. it has been sitting there and we never have the courage to take it out. all of these issues that you are talking about, things that deal with education. the pass this in the house. i think there is plenty of frustration with the u.s. senate. >> the perception around the world is that america has become ungovernable. it canno
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 947 (some duplicates have been removed)